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Winter Sports
32 images for snow bunnies and seasoned skiers

Top images for skiing, sledding, and bobsledding on the world’s best slopes: The Alps, Davos, Colorado, and the American Northeast.

1. Palace Hotel / St. Moritz. 1920.
By Emil Cardinaux (1877-1936)
35 3/4 x 50 in./90.8 x 127 cm
Est: $8,000-$10,000

This is one of Cardinaux’s best and most evocative posters. It recalls childhood memories of snowy escapes and family photographs from vacations past. The main purpose of the poster—the promotion of St. Moritz as a winter sports hot spot—is left to the background. Instead, an elegantly bundled lady is the focus, her party deep in lazy chitchat while skaters glide by their chairs. Cardinaux doesn’t need to overstate the Alps’ ideal climate for wintry sports—instead, he allows us to luxuriate in a relaxing getaway.

2. Klosters / 14. Grosses Ski-Rennen. 1919.
By Carl Moos (1878-1959)
35 x 49 5/8 in./89 x 126 cm
Est: $2,500-$3,000

“This dynamic and vivid poster, designed in architectural style, plunges the viewer into the midst of the race. Not only did it contribute towards the recognition of Alpine skiing, which had been gradually evolving over the years, but it depicted this type of sportsman—sometimes portrayed as being a little stiff—in a new light” (Swiss Winter Posters, p. 41).

6. Winter Sports in the French Alps. ca. 1929.
By Roger Broders (1883-1953)
25 x 39 7/8 in./63.5 x 101.2 cm
Est: $5,000-$6,000

The French-text version of this image reads “To the Col de Voza via St. Gervais, Mont-Blanc Railroad.” This was evidently a day trip: the chic-looking skiers are coming off the train at this “station” of snow at the very foot of the slopes, toting the only required luggage for the outing: a pair of skis. The colorful sweaters against the white landscape evoke a crisp and exhilarating Alpine day.

10. Superbagnères-Luchon. 1929.
By Leonetto Cappiello (1875-1942)
24 1/2 x 39 1/4 in./62 x 99.6 cm
Est: $5,000-$6,000

“Bagnères-de-Luchon is a year-round resort in the Pyrenées, and the high-altitude Superbagnères is where serious skiers converge. To entice winter throngs, Cappiello gives the public a picture of young skiers having fun on the slopes. Their colorful attire adds to the wholesome interest that the area evokes” (Cappiello/Rennert, p. 292).

13. Olympic Winter Games / Garmisch-Partenkirchen. 1936.
By Ludwig Hohlwein (1874-1949)
24 3/4 x 39 3/8 in./63 x 100 cm
Est: $2,000-$2,500

This poster for the 1936 Winter Games, held at Garmisch-Partenkirchen, was designed by Hohlwein in 1934 and distributed throughout the world the following year in 13 languages (this is the English version). Deceptively simple, the image shows a skier hailing an unseen friend. The gesture makes a forceful statement and the Olympics emblem does the rest.

15. Flexible Flyer / Snowhaven.
By Sascha Maurer (1897-1961)
21 1/4 x 37 1/4 in./54 x 94.7 cm
Est: $1,200-$1,500

Maurer’s smiling skier was so endearing that she was used for various wintry destinations; this version promotes Snowhaven in Altamont, New York—a village whose name appropriately means “high mountain.” This 1940s resort was one of the earliest in the state.

21. Südbahn Hotel.
By Hermann Kosel (1896-1985)
23 3/4 x 36 3/4 in./60.4 x 93.2 cm
Est: $1,200-$1,500

Maurer’s smiling skier was so endearing that she was used for various wintry destinations; this version promotes Snowhaven in Altamont, New York—a village whose name appropriately means “high mountain.” This 1940s resort was one of the earliest in the state.

22. Sun Valley. ca. 1940.
By Dwight Clark Shepler (1905-1974)
24 7/8 x 37 1/4 in./63.2 x 94.5 cm
Est: $2,500-$3,000

Skiers take a breather at the Round House atop Baldy Mountain in Idaho’s world famous Sun Valley. With little wind and an elevation of 5,750 feet, it quickly became a haven for skiers of all difficulty levels. The lifts were opened in the 1939-1940 season.

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